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Journal

2020 Trend Confirmations – Part 2

As part of the design process our designers reinterpret the international macro trends into themes where they apply a local lens to create inspirational and accessible textiles for our local and global customers. This year four key themes emerged: Calm Sanctuary, Maximalism, Back to Nature and Culturally Crafted.  

The popularity of the minimalist design movement is met with a bolder, more colourful and tactile theme through maximalism, while calming and nature-inspired trends remain important.  Driving these trends is the global motivation towards health and wellbeing, tapping into a more natural ethos via our interior design choices.

In the last of this two-part article our designers have examined the Back to Nature and Culturally Crafted trends by highlighting textiles from Mokum and James Dunlop which will allow you to explore these design trends in your interiors.

Back to Nature  

The theme of Back to Nature is characterised by the use of natural materials or hand-crafted elements to mimic natures narratives. The idea of bringing the outdoors in and looking to nature for inspiration has resulted in the growing popularity of patterned textiles and wallpapers featuring lush botanicals, wild animals (in particular monkeys and birds), mixed with romantic blooms and rich tropical foliage to add depth. Back to Nature celebrates a global wellness movement in which greenery and plants are enjoyed in abundance within the interior space, said to improve ones physical and mental wellbeing. In an uncertain pandemic-influenced world this, trend will only strengthen.

Left To Right Top Row
1. La Palma | Mokum image via nattyandpolly.com.au
2. Image via ingredientsldn.com
3. Image via popsugar.com
Left To Right Bottom Row
1. Image via Tumblr
2. Image via Electic Trends
3. Image via Pintrest
 

Left To Right Top Row

1. La Palma | Mokum image via nattyandpolly.com.au

2. Image via ingredientsldn.com

3. Image via popsugar.com

Left To Right Bottom Row

1. Image via Tumblr

2. Image via Electic Trends

3. Image via Pintrest

 

Culturally Crafted

In synchronicity with Back to Nature's connection with the ‘land’, Culturally Crafted has a connection with the ‘people’ illustrated through the increased use of folk, archival and artisanal or tribal inspirations, embracing the world’s global heritage. Design influences from Asia, the Middle East and Africa work together to speak to cultural fluidity. Patterns made of raffia, cotton and cane and organic looking surfaces represent a more natural aesthetic with reference to a distant past.

Craftsmanship is celebrated and revered as conscious consumers steer away from mass produced items in search of bespoke, speciality pieces for the home. Hand worked surfaces and a nod to arts and crafts movements and typologies are evident.

Left To Right Top Row
1. Image via houseatheart
2. Image via Sibella
3. Image via Pintrest
Left To Right Bottom Row
1. Image via Pintrest
2. Image via Pintrest
3. Image via www.glenproebstel.com

Left To Right Top Row

1. Image via houseatheart

2. Image via Sibella

3. Image via Pintrest

Left To Right Bottom Row

1. Image via Pintrest

2. Image via Pintrest

3. Image via www.glenproebstel.com

Year 2020 has been one of significant change globally with people having to adapt to a new way of life and of working in the home environment. Driven by a desire for their interiors to be reimagined as a safe and cosy sanctuary, it is highly probable that the textile trends we see in 2021 will be a further development of the emerging themes described above.

If you missed part-one of this article you can find it here. 

Related

NZ Summer - We Talk To Our Own | Part 1

People & Places

At the beginning of 2020 who knew we would be where we are now. With an ever growing importance to support our local communities through movements such as buy local and love local, this summer we will be holidaying in our own beloved New Zealand landscapes. Inspired by this we talk to some of our own on what they love in New Zealand and where they would go holidaying in Aoteroa.